Category Archives: minimalism

contentment

Being content with what you have in life is not an easy thing in the world we live in.  We are bombarded with advertisement, telling us that we need to buy this and that to make our lives better, or we need to travel here and there to get the most out of life.  What this does is rob us from being fully content with the life we currently live.  Living without that “fear of missing out” means turning off the noise of these merchants and looking at what makes you happy – not what these companies say should make you happy.

Contentment in my life comes from having affordable housing that provides the shelter my family and I need, my pets to love and cuddle, and the fulfilling relationships with those people I choose to spend my time with.  I am content with my daily walks with my dog, my bi-weekly date with one of my best friends, and the easy conversation with the man who is quickly becoming one of the most important people in my life.  There are, of course, other components to this, but these things are some of the most vital pieces that keep me happy.

Gratitude for what we have contributes to living a content life.  Appreciate all the good things that are present, and value the experience of the not so good things because it helps to truly see what blessings there are in life.  I hope to never lose sight of the truly important things that provide me with that sense of contentment that I have found.

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summer

Summer solstice has arrived.  With her, she brought beautiful sunshine and warmth.  Summer is easy to get lost in, with the luscious gardens teeming with fragrant blossoms and bountiful vegetable patches growing steadily day by day.  The days are long, lasting well into the wee evening hours when we are fortunate enough to witness the beautiful and colourful displays at sunset as they bid farewell to the daylight for just a few hours.

Summer, while it feels like it will never end, also seems to go by so fast.  Enjoy every moment as you live in the present.  Take the time to put your nose to a peony bloom and inhale its perfume.  Spend a lazy afternoon in a hammock with a book.  Take a walk through the forest trails and breathe in the oak and moss as you enjoy the cool shade from the canopy.  Sit patiently at the lakeside and wait for the dragonflies to come rest their weary wings as they visit for a moment.

Have gratitude for the gift of summer.  This present in this very moment is worth more than gold.  Savour the time spent in the here and now and store these precious memories for those cold winter days that will eventually be upon us.  But for now, right now, be present here with Mother Nature in all her summer glory.

new year, positive changes

With each new year, I, like many others, use this time to reaffirm the things I am doing in my life.  I use this time to evaluate what is working and what isn’t, and to decide if there is value in changing things.

I don’t necessarily like the term ‘resolution’ because to me that has a fairly negative connotation.  I don’t need to change everything.  But I do take this time of year to reflect on the past, and to help me see where I want my future to go.  I evaluate my financial standings and make my goals.  I evaluate these goals frequently through the year and celebrate when I achieve a personal victory.  I refigure things when something unforeseen comes up.  As I take down the Christmas tree, I reaffirm my commitment to minimalism, and give the house a good scrub to ring in the new year.  I use my vision board to help me map out my personal goals and desires.  Am I where I wanted to be?  Is there anything I need to adjust to get there?  How is that book coming along?  Have I made my goal in my photography progress?  Did I finish that course yet?  If the answer isn’t yes, then why didn’t they match up?  If they did, what are my next goals?

We sit here, on the last day of the year.  There is much joy to be celebrated from 2017.  There will also be much joy to come in 2018.  With some planning and positive reinforcements, it will be a great year to come.

the meditation of cleaning house

There is a certain sense of accomplishment that comes along with having a clean home.  I find there is pleasure not only in the final product, but also in the process.  I wouldn’t say I love to clean, but I do love when it is clean; but to get to that point, the action has to be taken.

I devote certain days to cleaning.  I do a seasonal deep cleaning, so like spring cleaning four times a year.  I love the freshness of this routine.  It helps me get to the areas that I may have forgotten or overlooked during my routine cleaning.  It is also that sense of accomplishment that rewards me every time I do it.  It also helps me to flush out the unwanted clutter that somehow always seems to make its way back into my spaces.

Yesterday was one of those seasonal deep cleaning days.  It was the three of us working away at it.  Ok, it was mostly me, and my older son was a great help, but the younger one did minimal work because he has been down with a hefty cold and lacking on energy.  Still, that feeling when you sit down, sore back and dried out hands from soapy water washes…that feeling is so rewarding.  Good, old fashioned manual labor.  It still has a place in our technologically driven world.

With a minimalist-style lifestyle, the seasonal cleaning sessions, as well as the weekly and daily I might add, they have become easier and shorter sessions.  They no longer take a week, or a weekend.  They take an afternoon, give or take.  Another reason why I adore this philosophy.  Now there is more time to do what I want, and I was able to sleep well last night knowing that the chore of house cleaning was completed.

your best gift is your time

We live in a world where everyone is busy; the faster the pace, the better.  But what would happen if we chose to slow down, even for a day?  What would happen if we said no to all those things that are supposedly so important that we can’t make time for ourselves or our loved ones?

With the spending season upon us, and Black Friday happening a mere two days ago, we are being bombarded with advertisements and flyers to buy this and spend our money on that.  But the things the stores are selling are far from the greatest gift you could give your child, spouse, or even your best friend.

My Black Friday evening, because I worked all day, was not spent shopping the so-called deals.  My Black Friday was spent enjoying the company of one of my very best friends in the world.  We gave each other the best give we could: our time and our attention.  It was a lovely three or four hour visit, sitting in the corner of a quaint tapas bar.  We enjoyed a couple glasses of red wine and a cheese board together as we took the time to catch up; to fill each other in on our lives.  There we were, sitting inside in the dim ambiance, with a tea light candle at one side of the table, and beautiful pieces of art on the walls next to us.  Outside, there was the bustle of the winter festival where we could see families passing by and enjoying the mild winter evening together.  We watched as children explored the fire truck parked just across the street, and the horse drawn wagons pass by with children happily waving at patrons as they glided by, courtesy of the team of horses and their driver.  We saw couples hand in hand as they walked past the window, smiling and clearly enjoying each other’s presence.

Time is more precious and more valuable than money.  In my world, if I want to show someone how much I care, I give them the gift of my time.  It is the most precious commodity I have.  Consider this, as we enter into the holiday season.  Consider re-thinking that expensive give in exchange for something that is far more precious and valuable.  Give the gift of your time.

minimalism and the holiday season

With November comes the prelude to the holiday season.  The buying season.  It makes me cringe thinking about it sometimes.  There is nothing that I need, except for a few renovations around my house.  My children have everything they need too.

The holiday season is that time of year where you feel that push…that obligation to buy things that really have no business coming into my home.  I do not need more kitschy knick knacks.  My kids don’t need more useless toys that they won’t play with.  And I certainly do not need to get deeper in debt for a holiday that seems more and more to be focused on spending money instead of time.

I am digging in my heels this year.  Yes, we have preplanned gifts from my parents, and that will still happen.  But, I have already forewarned my children that there is a strict budget in place for Christmas spending, and I will not go beyond it this year.

The great thing is, they are old enough to understand that the less we buy, the more money we can save for vacations and adventures.  This appeals to them; well more so to one of them, but the other can be fairly easily convinced…

As a minimalist (in the making), I feel that I need to cultivate the principal of spending more time together over spending more money on each other.  I hope this will become a trend with my loved ones.  Life is expensive enough without having to keep up with the Jones’, or even the exes for that matter.  I hope that one gift I can give to my children is the understanding that the holidays are meant for spending together, and not for overspending on the budget.

love for the library

I love libraries.  I love the smell of books, and seeing row upon row of books in the stacks.  I love the nostalgia I feel when I enter a library and think back to my days as a preteen girl, spending my summer holidays amongst the millions of stories that lived within the library walls.

Libraries, I am afraid, seem to be losing their appeal.  With the advent of ebooks, ereaders, and google, libraries seem to be less frequented by society as a whole.  It saddened me recently when there was a vote in my community where a new library was proposed to be built, and more than half the votes declined building the new branch library.  A part of my heart broke when the results were posted.  It seemed to signal the end of an era: an era where everyday life could be escaped and instead lived in the adventures awaiting in the library stacks.

But libraries still do amazing things.  They house audiobooks and videos alongside traditional paper books.  They house events for writers and readers, programs for preschool, children and teenagers.  They host author readings and interviews.  I was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to photograph three published authors for my local library this past week.  It was an honour to do so, and my nervousness quickly melted away as I had the chance to learn just a little bit of each author as a person, not just a master of the written word.

For those who still strive for simplicity in their lives, don’t forget about all the pleasures the library still provides.  Revel in the books and stories still available within your reach without adding to the clutter in your minimalist home.  Take in a book club discussion, or volunteer with other programs your library provides.  It is worth it.

do nothing

One of the things that I have noticed as I get older is how much I value having simplicity in my life.  I value a quiet existence.

When I was younger and eager, I had grander plans for my career.  I set myself up for a workaholic lifestyle.  I was no stranger to this; my father did the same, and even now, he still continues to do so even though he should maybe be enjoying his retirement years.  I worked hard, worked extra on my own hours assuming that this is what life was supposed to be, and at some point I would be rewarded with all the fruits of my labor.

It took a couple of decades (plus some) to realize that this is not the life I wanted.  I did what I thought I was supposed to do, then at the end of every night I would crash into bed for a couple hours of sleep only to rise again early the next morning and do it all over again.  I was exhausted, fuelled by caffeine and deeply unsatisfied even if I didn’t realize it at the time.

It took a major life event to change all of that for me.  It took a complete upheaval in my personal and even professional life to realize that I was miserable with what I was doing, and looked at how I could change my life to enjoy what I had.  The key was simple.  The key was a simple life.

Your job or your career is only a means to an end.  It does not define you.  It finances your life but it is not who you are.  

Once I looked at it in this way, my personal life began to flourish in ways I never saw before.  I love my personal time now.  I choose what to do with it.  I take classes in what interests me, not what I think will give me more advantages for work.  I create.  I love.  And sometimes, I do nothing.  Doing nothing was a difficult concept to grasp, but now that I have released so many of the career-focused ideals I enforced upon myself, I can now see how wonderful and refreshing doing nothing really can be.  I highly recommend it to anyone.

Enjoy your life.  Relax.  Take time to appreciate things.  Do something for yourself.  You won’t regret it.

meditation in modern life

This weekend I have had the very fortunate opportunity to spend it with a group of ladies with the same common interest.  We have all gathered to learn how to teach meditation.

What interests me about meditation is that while some consider it to be “New Age”, it seems that every culture and religion has some form of meditation; they may just call it something different.  Prayer with a rosary, meditation with a Tibetan mala… really, not much difference there.

Mindfulness is a buzz word that has been thrown around lately, but what does it mean to you?  Do things with intention.  Recognize what it is that you are doing.  Mindfulness is being taught in some schools.  Being mindful while eating is a tool used for some diet regimes.  All forms of meditation.

You can sit to meditate.  Lay down to meditate (be careful not to fall asleep, although, that is yet another form…), or walk to meditate.  This one is most difficult for me because walking is associated with thinking for me, which is the opposite of meditation.

Nature lends itself to calming and quieting the mind and is a wonderful place to sit and be still.  Have you ever tried it?  It is blissful.  It seems to melt away the stresses of what we do during our daily grind.

In the path of my life, it makes sense that meditation and mindfulness is present.  Along with minimalism, where intention of what lives or comes into my space, mindfulness is also present in every decision I make when it comes to consumerism or purging.  I become more acutely aware of the disarray in my space and it affects my inner serenity.  I wonder, does it affect yours also?

physical clutter affects everything

Clearing physical clutter is important.  It is important not just because it cleans the space you live in, but it cleans your mental space too.  Having stuff linger in your space affects many aspects of your life, whether you realize it or not.  It hangs over your head.  It’s one of those things that you think you will get to…eventually.  But when is that?  When does eventually come?

I had a garage full of waste.  I had a deck that needed work, and the debris ended up in my garage.  I didn’t think it through, I just knew that the deck needed to be fixed, and I would deal with the debris after the fact.  It was hidden in the garage, right where I should have been parking.  But for over two years, that clutter invaded my space and was constantly on my mind.  Not only that, I also had debris from some minor renovations I had done inside my home from up to four years ago.  It was sitting in my workroom in the basement and sitting on my mind, knowing full well that I needed to manage it at some point.

On an unrelated topic, but still relatable, I have a fantastic friend who pushes me to do things from time to time, in the best possible way.  He also needed to remove clutter, so we made a plan.  Yesterday, we were able to clear all that debris away for both of us.  We both have a clear space and that opens up mental space also.  I am able to park in my garage once again, and I have the ability to free up some of that mental space all that debris was taking up for something much better.

Sometimes we do not realize how much space and energy that physical clutter takes up in all facets of our lives.  If you consider one simple thing:  I had two winters of not being able to park in my garage.  That means two winters of wondering how much snow we received overnight, and expending energy to clear snow off my vehicle in order to get to work in the mornings.  Had I taken the time to remove that mess when it first was created, I could have spent those five to ten minutes every morning in a more relaxed way.

Clutter is a burden in many ways.  This long weekend is a perfect opportunity to tackle some of those burdens.  I have taken care of what was burdening me so that I can now appreciate the fruits of my labour.  I hope you can do the same.